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                         Heat stroke frost bite

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Heat Stroke

 

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Cool the body of a heatstroke victim immediately.

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If possible, put him in cool water; wrap him in cool wet clothes; or sponge his skin with cool water, rubbing alcohol, ice, or cold packs.

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Once the victim's temperature drops to about 101 F, you may lay him in the recovery position in a cool room.

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If the temperature begins to rise again, you will need to repeat the cooling process.

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If he/she is able to drink, you may give him some water.

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Do not give a heatstroke victim any kind of medication.

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You should watch for signs of shock while waiting for medical attention.

 

 

Frost bite

 

 

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Take the victim indoors if possible.

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Remove any wet clothing he/she may have on.

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Immerse the frostbitten parts in warm (not hot) water until they regain their pink color. If warm water is not available, wrap the affected parts gently in a sheet and warm blankets and keep the parts elevated.

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Do not rub or massage the frostbitten area. This could cause gangrene (decay of body tissue when the oxygen supply is obstructed) to set in.

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Do not try to warm the victim with a heat lamp or hot water bottle or place him near a hot stove. This could also cause gangrene.

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Do not break any blisters the victim may have because the blisters may become infected.

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If the victim is conscious and is not vomiting, give him warm liquids to drink to help the warming process.

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After the frostbitten parts are warmed, have the victim exercise them to maintain good circulation in those areas.

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If the victim's toes or feet are frostbitten, do not let them walk until they are warm. Walking could cause gangrene just as rubbing can.

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A doctor should be seen as soon as possible to make sure the parts heal properly.

 

 

Hypothermia

 

 

 

 Symptoms

 

 Vigorous, uncontrollable shivering

 As hypothermia progresses...

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Dizziness

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Lightheadedness

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Muscular stiffness

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Difficulty in moving

 If no treatment is given...

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Slurred speech

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Slow pulse

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Memory loss

 If still no treatment is given...

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Unconsciousness

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Eventual death

 Treatment

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The body temperature must be raised slowly. Warming the victim's body too quickly could cause tissue damage.

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Take him/her indoors or to an area of shelter.

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If the victim's clothes are wet, have him remove them and replace them with warm, dry clothes as soon as possible.

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The victim may want to wrap up in a blanket and sit near a heater or fireplace until he is warm.

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Give the victim warm liquids (i.e. hot apple cider, soup, etc.) if he/she is fully conscious.

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The victim should not drink liquids that contain caffeine.

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Make sure the victim gets medical attention as soon as possible.

 

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