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                Fractures Dislocations

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Up | First aid kit | Blood pressure | Temperature pulse | CPR | Abrasions | Bleeding nosebleed | Burns | Dog bite | Fractures Dislocations | Poisonings | Snake bite | Bee sting | Chocking | Fainting | Electric shock | Convulsions | Heat stroke frost bite | Splints | Practical First aid

Fractures

 

 

                                                      

                                                                                                     

                                                                                    

            

                              

                   Fracture                                            Splint / Sling support for arm, forearm fracture

 

 

                      

 

                                                      Splint support for finger, wrist, forearm fracture

 

 

 If a fracture is suspected.

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Check for swelling around the affected area

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There may be discoloration of the skin

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If the victim complains of tenderness and pain in the area or says that he felt or heard a bone snap, see a doctor immediately.

 

 A simple fracture

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does not pierce through the skin. If it is not cared for properly, it could become a compound fracture.

 

 What to do for a simple fracture 

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Apply a splint

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In case of arm fracture use a large triangular bandage to make a sling to prevent the arm from moving.

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Once a splint has been applied to a fracture, carefully elevate the wounded area to slow blood flow to the wound.

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Contact the doctor.

 

 

 A compound fracture

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Pierces through the skin.

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Serious bleeding may occur with this kind of wound.

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Do not apply pressure to a compound fracture to stop the bleeding.


 What to do for a compound fracture 

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Cover the injured part with a sterile pad. Control bleeding by holding a clean cloth on the wound before applying a splint

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Apply a splint to keep the bone from causing further injury to the surrounding tissues

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Pressure should be avoided to prevent the bone from splintering and causing more damage to surrounding tissues.

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Avoid moving the victim, but keep him warm, comfortable, and reassured.

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Wait for medical help.

 

Dislocations

 

 The most common dislocations occur in the shoulder, elbow, finger, or thumb.
 

 What to look for

 Look for these signs.

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Swelling

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Deformed look

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Pain and tenderness

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Possible discoloration of the affected area

 If a dislocation is suspected...

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Apply a splint to the joint to keep it from moving.

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Try to keep joint elevated to slow blood flow to the area

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A doctor should be contacted to have the bone set back into its socket.

 

 

 Take These Precautions Immediately While Waiting For Medical Help

 Stop the bleeding.

  • If there is bleeding, press directly on the wound with a sterile bandage, clean cloth or piece of clothing. If nothing else is available, use your hand. Try to elevate the injured area above the heart to reduce bleeding and swelling. Apply pressure until the bleeding stops.

 

 Immobilize the area.

  •  Keep joints above and below the fracture immobilized, but don't try to set the bone. A splint stabilizes the damaged parts and prevents unwanted movement of the parts that could aggravate tissue damage. Proper splinting may reduce pain. Use any rigid material such as wood, plastic or metal to design a splint. The splint should be longer than the bone it is splinting and extend below and above the injury. Pad the splint with gauze wherever possible. Pads make the splint more comfortable and help keep the bones straight. Fasten the splint to the limb with gauze or strips of cloth or string. Start wrapping from the extremity and work toward the body. Splint the limb firmly to prevent motion but not tight enough to stop blood flow.

     

 To Splint A Lower Arm


                                                                               


Tie rolled magazines or newspapers around a broken lower arm. Wrap a sling over the shoulder and a band around the sling to help keep the elbow still.
 


 To Splint A Lower Leg

 


 

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Place the entire leg between two splints. If no splints are available, use the healthy leg as a splint to impede movement of the broken one. If the thighbone is broken, immobilize the hip joint by gently moving the person onto a rigid surface such as a tabletop or door.

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Apply cold. If ice is available, wrap the ice in cloth and apply it to the splinted limb.

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Treat for shock. If the person becomes faint or is breathing in short breaths, he or she may be in shock. Lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk and elevate the legs. CALL for help.

 

 RICE Treatment            

 RICE = Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate

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Treatment of a sprains and strains is often accomplished with the "RICE" method. If you are unsure of the severity of your sprain or strain, talk to your doctor before beginning any treatment or rehab. The following is an explanation of the RICE method of treatment for sprains and strains:
 

 Rest:

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The first 24-48 hours after the injury is considered a critical treatment period and activities need to be curtailed. Gradually use the injured extremity as much as tolerated, by try to avoid any activities that cause pain. Often using a splint, sling, or crutches is necessary to adequately rest the injured body part.
 

  Ice:

 

                                                                                   

                               

Cold compresses at site of injury

 

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For the first 48 hours post-injury, ice the sprain or strain 20 minutes at a time every 3-4 hours. The ice pack can be a bag of frozen vegetables (peas or corn), allowing you to be able to re-use the bag.
 

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Another popular treatment method is to fill paper cups with water then freeze the cup. Use the frozen cube like an ice cream cone, peeling away paper as the ice melts. Do NOT ice a sprain or strain for more than 20 minutes at a time!! You will not be helping heal the injury any faster, and you can cause damage to the tissues! Learn how to ice an injury here...
 

 Compression:

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Use compression when elevating a sprain or strain in early treatment. Using an Ace bandage, wrap the area overlapping the elastic wrap by one-half of the width of the wrap. The wrap should be snug, but not cutting off circulation to the extremity. So, if your fingers or toes become cold, blue, or tingle, re-wrap!
 

 Elevate:

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Keep your sprain or strain as best possible--try to get it higher than your heart if possible. Elevate at night by placing pillows under your arm or leg.
 

 

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