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Bee sting

 

                                                                        

 

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Remove the stinger by scraping with your fingernail or the blade of a knife

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Wash the area thoroughly with soap and water

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Apply ice, calamine lotion, or baking soda and water mixture to relieve the swelling and pain

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A stinger that is not removed continues to release venom into the body for as long as 20 minutes.

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Do not remove a stinger with tweezers. Squeezing releases more of the poison into your body.

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The swelling should be gone within 24 hours.

 

     Spider bite

   

                          Black Widow spider

  • Spider venoms are a cocktail of many chemicals. Some are toxins, which evolved in order to kill or immobilize arthropods like insects by attacking their nervous systems; others help break down the victim's tissues so the spider can ingest a liquefied meal. Unfortunately, a few of these chemicals can be seriously toxic to people. But in general, spider venoms cause us no more than mild local pain and inflammation

 

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Those at greatest risk, as with any poison, are the very young or elderly and those with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

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Suspected funnel-web or mouse spider bites should always be treated as quickly as possible by applying a pressure bandage and immobilizing the victim (do not cut the wound or apply a tight tourniquet)

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Bandaging is not necessary for Redback Spider bites. Applying pressure worsens the pain that often comes with Redback bites.

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The application of a cold pack may help if the bite is painful. For most spider bites, no other first aid is necessary.

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Always seek medical attention for any suspected funnel-web, mouse or Redback Spider bite and for any other bite if symptoms develop or persist.

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Catch the spider for positive identification if you can.

 

Pressure bandages slow down the movement of venom into the bloodstream, which reduces the effect of the nerve toxins in the venom. Pressure bandages should only be used for funnel-web or mouse spider bites. When the spider bites someone, the venom is injected into the tissue under the skin. A pressure bandage slows down the movement of both tissue fluid and blood near the surface. This prevents the venom from rapidly reaching the bloodstream and is very effective treatment as long as the patient is kept still.

 

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

                                                        

 

        Keep the victim as still as possible.                                                      Do not remove the bandage. 

 

  •    Seek medical attention as soon as possible.

 

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