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Applying splints

 

 

 

                    

Taking a supportive action                                        

A splint can be corrugated cardboard, folded newspapers, boards, straight sticks, or a rolled-up blanket. A splint helps protect the injury until help arrives. The splint should be long enough to extend beyond the joints on both sides of the fracture.

 

 

How to apply the splint   

 

                         

    

               Support foot, ankle, Lower leg                                                  Splint Elbow     

                 

 

     

 

                  Support - hand injuries                                 Support for chest injury / Fracture Ribs

 

 

     

 

                                                                Finger injuries support  

 

 

                                                             

 

                             Arm Sling Support                                                             Back Support  

 

 

 

Figure of 8 bandage -fracture collar bone

       

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Use strips of cloth, handkerchiefs, ties, or belts to hold the splint in place. Be sure not to secure the splint so tightly that it causes poor circulation below the wound.

 

 

 For arm fractures

 

        

 

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Apply a splint

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Use a large, triangular bandage to make a sling to prevent the arm from moving.

 

 Remember

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Once a splint has been applied to a fracture, carefully elevate the wounded area to slow blood flow to the wound.

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For a compound fracture, control bleeding by holding a clean cloth on the wound before applying a splint.

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Pressure should be avoided to prevent the bone from splintering and causing more damage to surrounding tissues.

 

  

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